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Before yesterdaySpace Adventures

Space travel grows 20 years after 1st space tourist

May 5th 2021 at 11:36

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60 years since 1st American in space: Tourists lining up

May 5th 2021 at 11:32

“By opening up his checkbook, he (Dennis Tito) kicked off an industry 20 yrs ago,” Space Adventures co-founder Eric Anderson tweeted last week. “Space is opening up more than it ever has, and for all.”

Read More

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First space tourist: ‘It was the greatest moment of my life’

May 5th 2021 at 11:24
On April 30, 2001, Dennis Tito arrived at the International Space Station. “I was euphoric. I mean, it was the greatest moment of my life, to achieve a life objective, and I knew then that nothing could ever beat this.”

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Blog: The 20th Anniversary of Private Spaceflight

April 23rd 2021 at 15:01

A Look Back

Let’s start by saying that nothing worthwhile comes easy. We’re celebrating the 20th anniversary of Dennis Tito’s spaceflight. He made history by becoming the first fare-paying private citizen to launch to space. But the road that he traveled to get there was full of challenges.

Cast your mind back 20 years ago to April 2001. Some of you reading this may not have been born. The September 11th attacks on the United States had not yet happened. The iPod was months away from launch, but Wikipedia had just gone live. Barry Bonds was just warming up for his steroid-fueled home run tear. George W. Bush was only in his 3rd month of his presidency and Vladimir Putin just assumed office.

Chance of a Lifetime

That was the world when former JPL engineer Dennis Tito, at 60 years of age, was offered the chance to fulfil his lifelong dream. Dennis long believed in space exploration. Eric Anderson had a dream too. He, like Dennis, wanted to launch to space. Unfortunately, poor eye sight prevented Eric from pursuing that dream. But Eric had been rethinking space exploration and came to the conclusion that it shouldn’t be for just former fighter pilots from the ‘Right Stuff’ era.

Soon after Eric graduated from college, he co-founded Space Adventures with a few like-minded individuals. Their mission was to open the space frontier to all. That was 1998. Eric thought that Space Adventures’ first customers would launch to space on suborbital flights. He was not expecting to launch a tourist all the way to low-Earth orbit, but that’s what happened.

“Human interest in exploring the heavens goes back centuries. This is what human nature is all about.”

– Dennis Tito

Soyuz launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome

Challenges at Every Step

Even with the support of the Russian space agency, including his crew members, the road to launching Dennis Tito to space would prove to be very difficult. Luckily, Dennis is a very determined individual. With every challenge that Eric and Dennis faced together, they did not waver.

Support from Dennis Tito’s crew was immense

This mission was to be groundbreaking – the first time that a self-funded civilian was to launch to space. Dennis was to visit the International Space Station that was brand new and still under construction. When Eric first approached the Russians with the idea of flying a non-professional to space they said that no one would pay the price to fly. Eric told them that he already had a client. The officials at Roscosmos were astonished.

Now, you have to remember, no one had an idea of the value of spaceflight. No market studies had ever been published. SpaceShipOne was years away from flight and SpaceX wasn’t even founded yet. Commercial spaceflight, let alone space tourism, was just in the ether. But this was a window of opportunity — a chance to make something otherwise impossible real. And Eric just set US$20 million dollars as the price of a ticket to launch to orbital space. This mission would create an entirely new marketplace if Dennis and Eric could jump through enough hoops to get to the launch pad.

The Russians developed the medical and training guidelines that Dennis would have to follow to be certified to launch on a Soyuz. A month before Dennis’ planned launch, he and his Russian crew traveled to the NASA Johnson Space Center to be trained on the U.S. segment of the space station.

Dennis Tito training for his orbital spaceflight during a parabolic flight

Safety Threat or Politics?

But NASA refused to train Dennis. At that time, NASA believed that civilians would pose a safety threat in orbit. And that Dennis was not properly trained for the flight, not to mention the liability associated with him being on station. Even though non-professional astronauts had launched to space on the U.S. Space Shuttle (e.g. former Senator Bill Nelson), NASA balked at the idea of the Russians taking a tourist to space simply because he was wealthy enough to pay for it.

The simple fact was that the Russian space agency was open for business, their mindset was open to train someone older, someone who was not a career astronaut. They were willing to draft medical and training protocols for a non-professional. NASA knew that age wasn’t a factor in spaceflight as they had flown John Glenn at age 77, three years before.

Dennis Tito continuing his training for his spaceflight

NASA continued to apply pressure for Dennis not to fly as the station was no place for a non-professional. But three days before launch, NASA and the ISS partners relented and provided an exemption for Dennis to visit the space station.

History Made

Dennis Tito embraces his crew members after arriving at the International Space Station

“I am enjoying this so much. If I were allowed, I would spend several months up here in space.”

– Dennis Tito

He flew, had an amazing experience, and entered the history books as the first fare-paying private citizen in space! And since Dennis’ historic flight, six additional private citizens have flown to the space station. All of them paying their own way. All of them dedicated to understanding their role and responsibilities. They helped demonstrate that you don’t have to have the ‘right stuff’ to live in space. Dennis led the way. We thank him for his patience, determination, and the dream that he never let die no matter what pressure he and Eric were put under.

Dennis Tito being recovered at the landing site after safely returning to Earth after his eight day spaceflight

Seven private citizens launching to orbit in 20 years may not seem like a lot, but the impact Dennis and his fellow non-professional astronauts has had on the future trajectory of human spaceflight is extraordinary. Ten years ago NASA started the Commercial Crew and Cargo Program, predicated on the notion that private companies could develop new spacecraft to supply NASA and the ISS partners with flights, but also to private customers. From this program came the SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule which has since been purchased for private flights to space. In 2019, NASA put forth a Commercial Use Policy and have sanctioned and endorsed a private mission to the ISS. Finishing their 180 degree turn from the position they took on Dennis’ flight.

“To me, it was a 40-year dream. The thing I have taken away from it is a sense of completeness.”

– Dennis Tito

We’re still waiting on suborbital spaceflight, but the future looks bright for orbital spaceflight opportunities. And it all began with Dennis Tito. He never faltered and neither did we.

To learn more on how Eric seized a Window of Opportunity with Tito’s spaceflight, check out this.

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Blog: Commercial Spaceflight in 2021

March 30th 2021 at 15:55

Commercial Spaceflight in 2021

In early 2019 I wrote what is still one of the most popular blogs on Space Adventures’ website – Commercial Spaceflight in 2019. I thought it would be interesting to re-visit this topic and look at the status of commercial spaceflight at the start of 2021.

As is often the case in the space industry (and I am sure many others) things have not progressed as rapidly as I anticipated. Of the four new spacecraft I profiled in the 2019 blog post, only one has taken humans to space. The others are still working towards that goal, and could debut in 2021, or even slip to 2022.

Orbital spaceflight

Definition: An orbital spaceflight is where a spacecraft is placed on a trajectory and at a speed fast enough where it can remain in space.

The Soyuz spacecraft attached to the International Space Station.

Since I wrote the 2019 blog, the reliable Soyuz has launched and returned four crews to the International Space Station, with a fifth now in space. In the same way it has since 1967, the Soyuz is an ever present and highly reliable workhorse of crewed spaceflight, seeing human spaceflight through the Apollo era, the Space Shuttle era, and now continuing to fly, in a highly upgraded version in the new SpaceX Dragon era. Two Space Adventures’ clients will fly on Soyuz to the International Space Station later this year.

The Boeing Starliner spacecraft

Being developed by Boeing as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, the Starliner’s un-crewed test flight in December 2019 fulfilled many objectives, but a software and timing issue meant it did not meet all of the test objectives. Boeing took 2020 to complete the fixes needed and a little more, and will take a second attempt at the test flight in the next few months, with a view to flying with crew in the summer of 2021.

The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft attached to the ISS.

The SpaceX Crew Dragon was certainly the star of the last couple years. In midst of the pandemic in June 2020 SpaceX successfully launched the first crew – NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station. And later in the year delivered a full complement of four astronauts for a full six-month tour of duty on the International Space Station.

In addition to further missions for NASA, SpaceX have missions planned in 2021 and 2022 taking private citizens to the International Space Station and on a free-flight to low-Earth orbit.

Suborbital Spaceflight

Definition: a flight to 100km above the Earth.

A phenomenal experience and beautiful view, but since you are only in space for a few minutes it’s a markedly different from living in space.

 

Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo

Now a public company, trading as SPCE, the last couple years have been pretty eventful for Virgin Galactic. But the start date of commercial service continues to be a bit of a mystery, and was just recently pushed back to 2022.

Blue Origin’s New Shepard

While Blue Origin’s New Shepard will one day launch with people, they seem content to be launching a few times a year carrying scientific payloads to the edge of space. Given the solid track record of 13 successful un-crewed flights, I have to think they are not far away from adding the first test crews, but Blue is not one for publishing schedules.

Starship (the new kid on the block)

The SpaceX Starship during a test flight

Designed with Mars colonization in mind, SpaceX’s Starship is huge. First contemplated by SpaceX back in 2012, the Starship name was announced in 2018 at the same time as the first mission, to fly around the far-side of the Moon, was purchased by Japanese e-commerce billionaire Yusaku Maezawa. That mission is forecast to take place in 2023. Quite an ambitious schedule for such a complex system, but SpaceX seems to be dedicating huge resources towards the effort, and testing is well underway.

The combination of the Starship and its booster rocket will be 122m tall and 9m diameter. Starship can transport huge payloads into space. This massive sizes means that people on-board would have much more space to move around in, than the capsule systems detailed above.

We are keeping a close eye on the Starship development. It’s a very exciting program.

In Summary

So as with 2019, I have to conclude that this year promises to be another exciting one in the world of human spaceflight.  I am certain that one, if not two of the vehicles I have profiled above will start to fly with humans onboard in 2021.  And for any of you reading this who have your own spaceflight ambitions, that is a very welcome prospect.

The post Blog: Commercial Spaceflight in 2021 appeared first on Space Adventures.

Season’s Greetings 2020

December 22nd 2020 at 09:55

I think many of us will be glad to see the end of 2020 and will welcome 2021 with open arms.  But before we do, I thought it was worth looking back at some of 2020’s significant achievements in the field of space exploration – completed despite the global pandemic – as well as some of our favorite photographs of Earth taken by astronauts onboard the International Space Station.

2020’s Great achievements in space exploration

Asteroid collected and returned to Earth 

Hayabusa Asteroid Sample

Japan’s Hayabusa mission successfully collected and returned part of an asteroid to Earth. 

Chinese land rover on the Moon

Chinese Lunar Lander on the Moon

The Chinese successfully landed a rover, became the third nation to plant their flag on the Moon, and returned lunar material to Earth.

The ISS celebrates 20 years

International Space Station

The International Space Station celebrated 20 years in space.  With the first modules launched in 2000, this year marked 20 years of a continued human presence in space with a huge list of scientific achievements, and unprecedented international cooperation. 

SpaceX launch first crew

SpaceX Crew1

The SpaceX Dragon launched crew into space for the first time ever, and it was the first time in 10 years that crew had launched from US soil. 

Our favorite photographs of Earth taken by astronauts during 2020

Storm and dust clouds over the Bahamas.
Dust and storm clouds over Grand Bahama

Thunder clouds clearly visible over Grand Bahama, and the top of the photo should be open ocean, but it is obscured by Saharan dust plume that had travelled over 7,000 km. Taken in June 2020.  Read more.

Northern Europe at night
Northern Europe at night

Northern Europe at night as photographed from the International Space Station, with London, Paris and Brussels clearly visible.  And notice the difference in the lighting of roads at night in Belgium compared to France!

Comet Neowise seen in a timelapse from the International Space Station

A NASA astronaut took this time lapse sequence of the comet Neowise as it passed close to Earth in the summer 2020.

International Space Station transiting the Sun

This is not a photograph taken by an astronaut on the ISS, but was taken by my favorite new Twitter follow @AJamesMcCarthy, an astro-photographer based in the western United States.  He takes these stunning photos of space from his backyard.  Definitely worth a follow!

This image shows the International Space Station (at the top) passing in front of the Sun.

We wish you the best for 2021!

The Space Adventures’ team wishes you the best for 2021!  We have an exciting year ahead as we prepare for two clients to fly on the Soyuz to the International Space Station in December, and we’ll be sure to keep you posted of their progress.  

And please remember we are here to help you realize your own dreams of flying to space, so never hesitate to reach out – it’s never too early to start the conversation!

Ad astra.

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A Day in the Life of a Private Astronaut (Part 2)

September 2nd 2020 at 05:05

A Day in the Life of a Private Astronaut (Part 2)

We are often asked what there is to do on the International Space Station (ISS) – while the view is phenomenal (and the pictures don’t lie!) surely visitors don’t just spend all day looking out of the window.  So in this two-part blog post we aim to provide some insight into everyday life in space. In Part 1 we looked at how private astronauts on-board the ISS go about their morning routine, conduct science experiments, use communication systems and prepare food. For Part 1 see here.

Observing Earth / taking photographs

The ISS has amazing views! At about 300 miles above Earth, traveling at 17,500 mph, and circling the Earth every 90 minutes, let’s face it you definitely would want to spend some time looking out of the window!

There is a computer program – Windows on Earth – that identifies what you are flying over at any given time, and there is a vast array of still and video cameras you can use to make sure you return with some awesome pics!

Amateur radio

One of the most basic communication systems, but still used by a lot of visitors to the ISS, our past clients included. Amateur or ham radio allows you to connect briefly with people on Earth as you fly overhead.  Our clients participated in a number of scheduled sessions with students supported by ham radio experts on the ground, as it provided a great opportunity for the students to learn about space and radio communications at the same time.  But it is also possible to just turn on the radio for unscheduled communications with ham radio users on Earth!

Sleeping in space

Weightlessness means you are continually floating.  So no lying down on a comfy mattress to look forward to at the end of the day.  But it is said that sleeping in space is just as relaxing.  Astronauts spend their night in a sleeping bag that is tied to the wall to stop from floating.

Fun in Weightlessness

Floating in weightlessness is one of the joys of being in space.  It makes some aspects of life a little difficult, but astronauts say they miss it after they have returned to Earth.  This video shows some of the fun you can have in weightlessness.

We hope you have enjoyed this two part blog on life in space.  If you would like to learn more about how you could experience this for yourself, please contact us.

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A Day in the Life of a Private Astronaut

June 30th 2020 at 05:00

A Day in the Life of a Private Astronaut (Part 1)

A small group of lucky (and very successful) people have launched to the International Space Station (ISS) on flights arranged by Space Adventures. In the coming years Space Adventures has opportunities to fly to the ISS on both the Russian Soyuz and the Boeing Starliner. We are often asked what there is to do on the ISS – while the view is phenomenal (and the pictures don’t lie!) surely visitors don’t just spend all day looking out of the window.  So in this two-part blog post we aim to provide some insight into everyday life in space.

Morning routine

Time on the ISS is set to UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) and the day begins around 6:00 a.m. And just like on Earth, everyone starts the day getting cleaned-up and refreshed. Being in a weightless environment there are no such thing as running water from a faucet or a nice warm shower, so you must make do with a lot of wet towels and no-rinse shampoo.

Shaving in space

Brushing teeth in space

Washing hair in space

Science Experiments

The ISS is fundamentally a science laboratory with experiments being conducted in fields as diverse as physical & life sciences, remote sensing and technology development. Even the crew are subject to experiments to see how the human body reacts to living in space for extended periods of time. Our clients have taken the time to participate in some of the these ongoing studies. They have also conducted their own science experiments using some of the ISS equipment (after receiving the full and proper training of course!)

Using NASA communications

Communication assets on the ISS are really very good. The ISS is outfitted with Wi-Fi allowing connection to high speed (600 Mbps) internet via the TEDRIS satellite system.  Through special arrangements with NASA, our clients have been able to make use of this system for voice, video, and e-mail communication. There are also direct-to-ground radio and video communication systems, so you’re never out of touch!

Food preparation

Everyone’s gotta eat! And just like on Earth meal times in space are a time to catch-up and socialize. The ISS galley has an array of food from the different countries that make up the ISS partnership so all tastes can be catered for.

However in weightlessness there is no natural convection, meaning food must be heated in a slightly different way, either with hot water or using a forced air convention oven.

Recent experiments have successfully grown mixed greens like lettuce and cabbage in space. While these are not yet available for astronauts to eat, they will be in the future.

That concludes the first part of our Day in the Life of a Private Astronaut blog.  In Part Two, we will look at how private astronauts can take photographs of Earth, use an old school “ham-radio”, and how they sleep in space.

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Space Adventures looks for a customer to do a spacewalk after Russia gives its OK

June 26th 2020 at 09:42

Russian space officials say that they’ve signed off on a commercial deal with Virginia-based Space Adventures to fly two customers to the International Space Station in 2023 — and that one of those customers would be allowed to do a spacewalk.

Read more.

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Energia and Space Adventures Sign Contract for Orbital Space Tourist Flight

June 25th 2020 at 10:21

Energia and Space Adventures Sign Contract for Orbital Space Tourist Flight

Opportunity for two spaceflight participants to launch to the ISS for 14-day stay

June 25, 2020 – S.P. Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation “Energia” and Space Adventures, Inc. signed a contract for a short duration spaceflight of two spaceflight participants on board the same “Soyuz” spacecraft to the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS).

One of the mission participants will have an opportunity to conduct a spacewalk outside the space station, becoming the first private citizen in history to experience open space. Accepted and secured candidates will be required to complete specialized training and additional simulations in preparation for the spacewalk attempt.

“A private citizen completing a spacewalk would be another huge step forward in private spaceflight. We appreciate the chance to celebrate two decades of orbital space tourism with our Russian partners by opening up another first-ever experience. We applaud our colleagues at Energia for working with us to create amazing new adventures in space,” said Eric Anderson, Chairman and CEO of Space Adventures, Inc.

About Space Adventures

Space Adventures, the company that organized the flights for the world’s first private space explorers, is headquartered in the Washington, D.C. metro area. It offers a variety of programs available today, including spaceflight missions to the International Space Station, around the Moon, record-breaking orbital missions, and various training and spaceflight qualification programs. The company’s orbital spaceflight clients include Dennis Tito, Mark Shuttleworth, Greg Olsen, Anousheh Ansari, Charles Simonyi, Richard Garriott, and Guy Laliberté.

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Private Mission Available on the SpaceX Crew Dragon

March 5th 2020 at 10:11

It’s the next step in humanity’s expansion beyond Earth

For almost 20 years, Space Adventures has created unique and previously impossible opportunities for private citizens to experience space. As you may know, we’ve arranged eight spaceflight missions to the International Space Station (ISS) with our clients traveling over 36 million miles. Along the way, we’ve also arranged several “firsts” in space tourism starting with, well, the First Space Tourist – in 2001! We have also arranged for:

  • The first African in space;
  • The first female space tourist;
  • The first space tourist to go more than once;
  • The first second generation US astronaut;
  • The first clown in space.

And now, we’re partnering with SpaceX for another “first of its kind” mission opportunity. The Dragon/Falcon 9 reusable system has consistently impressed the aerospace industry and we’re really excited to offer this mission opportunity.

Crew Dragon launch on Falcon 9 with assembly building

So, what’s the mission?

We’re offering the chance of a lifetime to launch aboard the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft to low-Earth orbit (LEO). We know that some people like to push boundaries and may be thrilled to orbit Earth in the autonomously-piloted Dragon. The spacecraft will be launched by the Falcon 9 rocket – same transportation system that will transport NASA astronauts to the space station.

Our previous clients visited the ISS, which is an amazing destination in LEO. But we want to offer our clients a choice and ability to find a mission that satisfies their desires, so for this mission we removed the visit to the ISS. This mission is another step forward in our ability to offer different spaceflight experiences.

Instead of visiting the ISS, this mission will provide up to four individuals with the opportunity to break the world altitude record for private citizen spaceflight and see planet Earth the way no one has since the Gemini program.

We believe this is an ideal mission for those seeking a simplified spaceflight experience and don’t have a large contingent of science to accomplish in space.

Here’s what it means:

  • The training time for the mission is greatly reduced. Training will focus solely on the Dragon spacecraft which requires minimal crew control. And the training will be conducted in the USA, which we know is appealing to a lot of our potential customers.
  • Because there is no docking with the ISS, we can reach a significantly higher altitude. Higher altitude means passengers will see much more curvature of the Earth and far greater area of Earth outside the window.
  • There are fewer constraints on the schedule and less complicated logistics. So this gives our clients a little more control of the schedule.

How many people can go

The mission can accommodate up to four people. Our clients will determine the final number. Obviously, the price changes depending on the number of people launching.

What’s the price?

The price for this mission is in the same range as past private orbital spaceflights. We can’t say more than that as it depends on who chooses to participate and the make-up of the participants. If you are interested in learning more, and when appropriate are prepared to demonstrate your financial capability, then contact us for more information.

Astronaut in spacesuit inside Crew Dragon Spacecraft

How long is the mission?

There are a number of factors to consider. Technical considerations determine the upper bound of what is possible – likely 3-4 days, but potentially up to 5 days, but the rest will be determined in consultation with our clients and SpaceX.

Not only are we excited to share with you this mission opportunity with SpaceX, but there are additional spaceflight windows of opportunities opening now as well.

Contact us to learn more.

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SpaceX teams up with space tourism agency to sell rides aboard its spacecraft

February 25th 2020 at 09:55

SpaceX has signed a deal with a space tourism company to organize a trip orbiting the Earth for a handful of adventurous travelers.

Space Adventures — which organized eight tourism trips to the International Space Station between 2001 and 2009 — plans to help organize a flight for four people aboard SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft. The trip could take place in late 2021, according to a press release and video Space Adventures released Tuesday.

Read more.

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SpaceX has plans to fly space tourists twice as high as the ISS

February 25th 2020 at 09:51

SpaceX is offering tickets for space tourists to fly on the same type of spacecraft that will bring NASA astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS). Through a partnership with the space tourism firm Space Adventures, four tickets are on sale to soar far above the ISS in a Crew Dragon capsule.

Read more.

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SpaceX will fly space tourists on Crew Dragon for Space Adventures

February 25th 2020 at 09:46

SpaceX just inked its first deal to launch space tourists into orbit on a Crew Dragon spacecraft.

The private spaceflight company founded by billionaire Elon Musk has signed an agreement with the U.S. space tourism company Space Adventures to launch up to four passengers on an orbital trip aboard a Crew Dragon space capsule. The mission would last up to five days and could launch as early as late 2021, Space Adventures representatives told Space.com.

Read more.

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SpaceX aims to launch up to 4 tourists into super high orbit

February 25th 2020 at 09:42

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX aims to launch up to four tourists into a super high orbit, possibly by the end of next year.

The private company is working with Space Adventures Inc. for the flight, officials announced Tuesday. Ticket prices are not being divulged but expected to be in the millions.

Space Adventures already has helped put tourists into orbit with trips to the International Space Station, working with the Russian space program. 

Read more.

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Space Adventures Announces Agreement with SpaceX to Launch Private Citizens on the Crew Dragon Spacecraft

February 18th 2020 at 09:01

Space Adventures Announces Agreement with SpaceX to Launch Private Citizens on the Crew Dragon Spacecraft

Mission profile provides opportunity to break a world record

February 18, 2020 — Building on the success of Crew Dragon’s first demonstration mission to the International Space Station in March 2019 and the recent successful test of the spacecraft’s launch escape system, Space Adventures, Inc. has entered into an agreement with SpaceX to fly private citizens on the first Crew Dragon free-flyer mission. This will provide up to four individuals with the opportunity to break the world altitude record for private citizen spaceflight and see planet Earth the way no one has since the Gemini program.

If interested parties are secured, this mission will be the first orbital space tourism experience provided entirely with American technology. Private citizens will fly aboard SpaceX’s fully autonomous Crew Dragon spacecraft launched by the company’s Falcon 9 rocket, the same spacecraft and launch vehicle that SpaceX will use to transport NASA astronauts to the International Space Station.

“This historic mission will forge a path to making spaceflight possible for all people who dream of it, and we are pleased to work with the Space Adventures’ team on the mission,” said Gwynne Shotwell, President and Chief Operating Officer, SpaceX.

“Creating unique and previously impossible opportunities for private citizens to experience space is why Space Adventures exists. From 2001-2009 our clients made history by flying over 36 million miles in space on eight separate missions to the ISS. Since its maiden mission in 2010, no engineering achievement has consistently impressed the industry more than the Dragon/Falcon 9 reusable system. Honoring our combined histories, this Dragon mission will be a special experience and a once in a lifetime opportunity – capable of reaching twice the altitude of any prior civilian astronaut mission or space station visitor,” said Eric Anderson, Chairman, Space Adventures.

About Space Adventures

Space Adventures, the company that organized the flights for the world’s first private space explorers, is headquartered in the Washington, D.C. metro area. It offers a variety of programs available today, including spaceflight missions to the International Space Station, around the Moon, record-breaking orbital missions, and various training and spaceflight qualification programs. The company’s orbital spaceflight clients include Dennis Tito, Mark Shuttleworth, Greg Olsen, Anousheh Ansari, Charles Simonyi, Richard Garriott, and Guy Laliberté.

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